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Creative Lift 035-Thoughts on Revising a Novel

Creative Lift 035-Thoughts on Revising a Novel

Where do you start with a full novel revision?
We’re finishing up season four of the podcast, Behind the Scenes of a Full-Novel
Revision, in which Alex Doherty, a fellow writer, and I have been discussing his full-novel
revision. Our conversation has been guided by his questions and goals for the
manuscript, and today we’re wrapping up the discussion. Alex has started his revision
process, using some of the strategies we’ve discussed this season, and he has some
insights to share.

LISTEN IN:

 

A huge thank you to Alex Doherty, who records and edits Creative Lift.

The feedback approach we’ve used in this season references Design Thinking tools and
mindsets. If you’d like to explore further how to apply Design Thinking to your writing
process, check out our Skillshare course, Design Thinking for Writers: Create a
Compelling Character, at this link.

EPISODE LINKS:

Design Thinking for Writers: Create a Compelling Character

Find me on Instagram: @naomikinsman 

 Find Alex on Instagram: @ag.doherty

 

Like this episode and want more? If so, I’d be ever so grateful if you’d follow and review the show:

Creative Lift 034- Playing with Pace

Creative Lift 034- Playing with Pace

How do you speed up and slow down the pace in your stories? And when do you
choose to speed up or slow down? What purpose does pacing serve in our storytelling?

We’re in season four of the podcast, Behind the Scenes of a Full-Novel Revision, in
which I’m discussing a full novel revision with my fellow writer, Alex Doherty, a fellow
middle-grade writer. In today’s episode, we’re discussing pace.

LISTEN IN:

 

A huge thank you to Alex Doherty, who records and edits Creative Lift.

The feedback approach we’ve used in this season references Design Thinking tools and
mindsets. If you’d like to explore further how to apply Design Thinking to your writing
process, check out our Skillshare course, Design Thinking for Writers: Create a
Compelling Character, at this link.

EPISODE LINKS:

Design Thinking for Writers: Create a Compelling Character

Find me on Instagram: @naomikinsman 

 Find Alex on Instagram: @ag.doherty

 

Like this episode and want more? If so, I’d be ever so grateful if you’d follow and review the show:

Creative Lift 033- How to Amplify a Character Arc

Creative Lift 033- How to Amplify a Character Arc

Whether you’re a plotter or a pantser, for every writer there’s generally room to amplify a
character arc in your novel once you’ve completed a full draft. But what does that
process look like, beyond firming up the first scene, the climax, and the final scenes?

We’re in season four of the podcast, Behind the Scenes of a Full-Novel Revision, in
which I’m discussing a full novel revision with my fellow writer, Alex Doherty, a fellow
middle-grade writer. In today’s episode, we’re looking at one of the most important
aspects to consider in a full-novel revision, the character arc.

LISTEN IN:

 

A huge thank you to Alex Doherty, who records and edits Creative Lift.

The feedback approach we’ve used in this season references Design Thinking tools and
mindsets. If you’d like to explore further how to apply Design Thinking to your writing
process, check out our Skillshare course, Design Thinking for Writers: Create a
Compelling Character, at this link.

EPISODE LINKS:

Design Thinking for Writers: Create a Compelling Character

Find me on Instagram: @naomikinsman 

 Find Alex on Instagram: @ag.doherty

 

Like this episode and want more? If so, I’d be ever so grateful if you’d follow and review the show:

Creative Lift 032- Keep the Question at Hand in Mind

Creative Lift 032- Keep the Question at Hand in Mind

Even if a story isn’t a mystery, there’s something about a great question that keeps us
turning pages. We want to know: What’s the answer? But can a question draw out too
long? How many questions does it take to turn suspense into confusion?

We’re in season four of the podcast, Behind the Scenes of a Full-Novel Revision, in
which I’m discussing a full novel revision with my fellow writer, Alex Doherty, a fellow
middle-grade writer. In today’s episode, we’re looking at questions and the role they
play in storytelling and pace.

LISTEN IN:

 

A huge thank you to Alex Doherty, who records and edits Creative Lift.

The feedback approach we’ve used in this season references Design Thinking tools and
mindsets. If you’d like to explore further how to apply Design Thinking to your writing
process, check out our Skillshare course, Design Thinking for Writers: Create a
Compelling Character, at this link.

EPISODE LINKS:

Design Thinking for Writers: Create a Compelling Character

Find me on Instagram: @naomikinsman 

 Find Alex on Instagram: @ag.doherty

 

Like this episode and want more? If so, I’d be ever so grateful if you’d follow and review the show:

Creative Lift 031- How to Keep Readers With You Page After Page

Creative Lift 031- How to Keep Readers With You Page After Page

Aside from interior monologue, are there other ways to clue a reader into a character’s
thoughts and emotions? How might we keep a reader informed if we don’t want to
submerge them in a sea of rumination?
We’re in season four of the podcast, Behind the Scenes of a Full-Novel Revision, in
which I’m discussing a full novel revision with my fellow writer, Alex Doherty, a fellow
middle-grade writer. Our conversation is guided by his questions and goals for the
manuscript, and today we’re looking at interior monologue.

LISTEN IN:

 

A huge thank you to Alex Doherty, who records and edits Creative Lift.

The feedback approach we’ve used in this season references Design Thinking tools and
mindsets. If you’d like to explore further how to apply Design Thinking to your writing
process, check out our Skillshare course, Design Thinking for Writers: Create a
Compelling Character, at this link.

EPISODE LINKS:

Design Thinking for Writers: Create a Compelling Character

Find me on Instagram: @naomikinsman 

 Find Alex on Instagram: @ag.doherty

 

Like this episode and want more? If so, I’d be ever so grateful if you’d follow and review the show:

Creative Lift 030-Listening for Our Character’s Voices

Creative Lift 030-Listening for Our Character’s Voices

When does a character’s voice come to life for you? And if you’re struggling to find a
character’s voice, what strategies might you use to illuminate it?
We’re in season four of the podcast, Behind the Scenes of a Full-Novel Revision, in
which I’m discussing a full-novel revision with Alex Doherty. In today’s episode, we’re
considering how Alex might build on the connection his readers feel with his characters.
He wants readers to be in the know about what’s going on, while also keeping up the
pace and excitement of the plot.
This season offers tools and questions to support you in a full novel revision. The goal is
that you’ll enhance your own desired effect while strengthening your unique writerly
voice.

LISTEN IN:

 

A huge thank you to Alex Doherty, who records and edits Creative Lift.

The feedback approach we’ve used in this season references Design Thinking tools and
mindsets. If you’d like to explore further how to apply Design Thinking to your writing
process, check out our Skillshare course, Design Thinking for Writers: Create a
Compelling Character at this link.

EPISODE LINKS:

Design Thinking for Writers: Create a Compelling Character

Find Naomi on Instagram: @naomikinsman

Find Alex on Instagram: @ag.doherty

 

Like this episode and want more? If so, I’d be ever so grateful if you’d follow and review the show:

Creative Lift 029 – How Close is Too Close

Creative Lift 029 – How Close is Too Close

When you’re reading, do you prefer to look at a character from a distance? Do you prefer to be deep in their thoughts? Or somewhere in between? And when you’re writing, how do you craft the distance between your fictional creations and your readers?

We’re in season four of the podcast, Behind the Scenes of a Full-Novel Revision, in which I’m discussing a full-novel revision with Alex Doherty. Our conversation is guided by his questions and goals for the manuscript, and today we’re looking at narrative distance. 

We’re considering how Alex might play with making the reader feel connected to his characters, and in the know about what’s going on, while also keeping up the pace and excitement of the plot.

This season offers tools and questions to support you in a full novel revision. The goal is that you’ll enhance your own desired effect while strengthening your unique writerly voice.

LISTEN IN:

 

A huge thank you to Alex Doherty, who records and edits Creative Lift.

The feedback approach we’ve used in this season references Design Thinking tools and mindsets. If you’d like to explore further how to apply Design Thinking to your writing process, check out our Skillshare course, Design Thinking for Writers: Create a Compelling Character at this link.

EPISODE LINKS:

Design Thinking for Writers: Create a Compelling Character

Find Naomi on Instagram: @naomikinsman

Find Alex on Instagram: @ag.doherty

 

Like this episode and want more? If so, I’d be ever so grateful if you’d follow and review the show:

Creative Lift 028 – How to Invite Feedback

Creative Lift 028 – How to Invite Feedback

Welcome to season four of Creative Lift: Behind the Scenes of a Full-Novel Revision. We’re experimenting with an alternate format this season, not to replace what we do here at Creative Lift, but to offer another type of invitation for you. 

Sometimes it’s helpful to be walked through an exercise, or presented with new ideas, the way we often do at Creative Lift. Other times, it’s helpful to hear those ideas applied. That’s why we decided to record a behind-the-scenes conversation that applies the tools that we explored last season: Design Thinking Tools for Writers. 

One of the biggest ways that Design Thinking reframes the writing process is that it invites you, the writer, to consider how others might collaborate with you in your process. How might you invite feedback in a way that supports you and builds your creative confidence, while staying true to your personal vision for your work?

This season will be a case study for that kind of collaborative conversation. I’m thrilled that this season also allows me to introduce you to Alex Doherty, who is not only my collaborator and editor for both Creative Lift and our Writerly Play Skillshare classes, but also a fellow middle grade author. In this season, we’ll share a conversation that considers a number of full-novel revision strategies that Alex is working with in his novel, Audrey Gray vs. the PTA.

In today’s episode, we start by giving you a birds’ eye view of Alex’s novel and his goals for what he wants to work on with this revision. You’ll notice that the conversation is driven by Alex’s questions rather than my perspective as his feedback partner. 

Here are the key questions we’re exploring during this season: How might a writer frame the feedback discussion in a way that supports their goals for their project, and also helps them see their work from an outside perspective? How might they maintain full ownership over the revision process rather than outsourcing that responsibility to their feedback partner?

This season offers tools and questions to support you in a full novel revision. The goal is that you’ll enhance your own desired effect while strengthening your unique writerly voice. 

LISTEN IN:

 

A huge thank you to Alex Doherty, who records and edits Creative Lift.

The feedback approach we’ve used in this season references Design Thinking tools and mindsets. If you’d like to explore further how to apply Design Thinking to your writing process, check out our Skillshare course, Design Thinking for Writers: Create a Compelling Character at this link.

EPISODE LINKS:

Design Thinking for Writers: Create a Compelling Character

Find Naomi on Instagram: @naomikinsman

Find Alex on Instagram: @ag.doherty

 

Like this episode and want more? If so, I’d be ever so grateful if you’d follow and review the show:

Creative Lift 027 – Make the Most of Your Design Thinking Tools

Creative Lift 027 – Make the Most of Your Design Thinking Tools

What role does intuition play in your creative process?

When you use design thinking tools, you bring intention to the way you approach your creative work. Sometimes, that mindfulness can feel like the opposite of intuition. Along the way as I learned design thinking, the question pops up now and then. What role is intuition playing here? Am I trusting my gut enough, letting go of control, allowing the magic of creativity to happen?

It’s an important question as we wrap up our conversation on design thinking. Yes, these tools are powerful. Yes, if we invite others into our creative work sooner we will have greater perspective. Yes, if we fail faster, we will succeed sooner.

And.

And, as you use these tools, there are moments when the right thing to do is to let go. Throw the system out the window. Follow your intuition and see where it will lead you.

LISTEN IN:

 

A huge thank you to Alex Doherty, who records and edits Creative Lift.

In this season of Creative Lift, we’re exploring how Design Thinking might apply to the craft of writing. If you’d like to explore these tools and mindsets further, check out our Skillshare course, Design Thinking for Writers: Create a Compelling Character, at this link.

EPISODE LINKS:

Design Thinking for Writers: Create a Compelling Character

IDEO U: Insights to Innovation

d.School Starter Kit

Find me on Instagram: @naomikinsman

 

Like this episode and want more? If so, I’d be ever so grateful if you’d follow and review the show:

Creative Lift 026 – Trial and Error Your Way Forward

Creative Lift 026 – Trial and Error Your Way Forward

How do you move a project toward completion? How do you know a creative project is done?

This season, we’ve been talking about Design Thinking, and today’s episode focuses on our penultimate topic: Iteration. There are two truths I want to be sure I underline today.

First, when we hit this stage in our creative process we’re not in the final stretch. We’re just beginning the messy middle. Making it to those anticipated words, “the end,” will require cycling back through the problem-finding and problem-solving stages of design thinking many more times.

And second, when we do return to those stages, we will not approach them in the same way we did before. Further down the road, ideation happens in a smaller possibility space, taking into account the decisions that have already been made. Picture a loop that gets smaller each time you cycle through this trial and error process.

LISTEN IN:

 

A huge thank you to Alex Doherty, who records and edits Creative Lift.

In this season of Creative Lift, we’re exploring how Design Thinking might apply to the craft of writing. If you’d like to explore these tools and mindsets further, check out our Skillshare course, Design Thinking for Writers: Create a Compelling Character, at this link.

EPISODE LINKS:

Design Thinking for Writers: Create a Compelling Character

IDEO U: Insights to Innovation

d.School Starter Kit

Find me on Instagram: @naomikinsman

 

Like this episode and want more? If so, I’d be ever so grateful if you’d follow and review the show: