Writerly Play Activity Collection – Make the Most of Feedback

Writerly Play Activity Collection – Make the Most of Feedback

Whether we love feedback or hate it, we all eventually must decide …

How do we make the most of it?

Especially when our emotions are high, it’s helpful to have a way to approach reflection, decision-making, and next steps. No matter your style, you’ll find an activity in this collection that will help you take the next round of creative feedback you receive and apply it effectively to your work.

The art of giving and receiving feedback is one of the cornerstone skills developed in the Writerly Play Cafe.

The Writerly Play Cafe, like the other Writerly Play rooms, is designed to help creatives separate their thinking into distinct steps. By knowing the purpose of a thinking task, we can utilize activities toward stronger results.

Choose the activity that best fits your creativity style. Not sure what your style is? Take the quick quiz and find out.

ACTIVITIES

Pin the Heart on the Problem

FOR INVENTORS

List the issues raised and then use “Why …?” to narrow in on the heart of the problem.

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The Question Queue

FOR ARCHITECTS

Line up your questions and address them one by one in this structured revision approach.

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And Down the Stretch they Come

FOR SPECIAL AGENTS

Choose the frontrunner issues and tackle them head-on with a quick-listing exercise.

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Scramble and Sort

FOR COLLABORATORS

After collecting feedback, scramble and sort it into new categories so the group can help the writer choose a starting place for a revision.

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Writerly Play Activity Collection – Storyboard Your Manuscript Your Way

Writerly Play Activity Collection – Storyboard Your Manuscript Your Way

No matter your creativity style, a storyboard will give you perspective.

If you’re an Inventor, you might struggle with a storyboard because it feels too structured. If you’re a Special Agent, you might feel like it’s a waste of time. If you’re an Architect, it might feel too “artsy.” Collaborators tend to love storyboards because they are visual, playful, and a helpful tool when creatives are working together.

Even if a storyboard isn’t your normal approach, I encourage you to take a look at these four different approaches to structuring your story idea visually. Use them, adapt them, experiment, and ultimately, save yourself tons of time by stepping back from your project and getting the perspective you need.

Structuring ideas is one of the cornerstone skills developed in the Writerly Play Workshop.

The Writerly Play Workshop, like the other Writerly Play rooms, is designed to help creatives separate their thinking into distinct steps. By knowing the purpose of a thinking task, we can utilize activities toward stronger results.

Here is a collection of Writerly Play approaches to storyboarding. Choose the activity that best fits your creativity style. Not sure what your style is? Take the quick quiz and find out.

ACTIVITIES

Storyboard Like a Detective

FOR INVENTORS

Define the scenario, collect clues, and ultimately, resolve your questions. Capture your thinking on your storyboard.

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Storyboard Like an Animator

FOR COLLABORATORS

Use the Hero’s Journey to structure your storyboard discussion with a collaborator.

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Storyboard Like a Reporter

FOR ARCHITECTS

Structure your thinking about a project with a reporter’s questions. Use your discoveries to shape your storyboard.

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Storyboard Like a Coach

FOR SPECIAL AGENTS

Run a few quick scenarios for your idea and then choose a game plan for your storyboard.

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Writerly Play Activity Collection: Improvise Your Way to the Page

Writerly Play Activity Collection: Improvise Your Way to the Page

Improvisation saves writers time.

Many writers are actually improvising when they write their first drafts. They following their spontaneity and intuition where it leads as they make their way from scene to scene. However, writing scenes takes a lot longer than playing through them in a visualization, or moving through them in a quick improv game. 

Plus, when playing an improv game, players are more likely to tap into a playful state of mind. Play can be elusive when working with words on a page. When drafting, it’s easy to listen to our inner critic and begin to re-read and revise as we go. That critical mindset blocks the intuitive flow that is so essential in a first draft. Thus, improvising not only saves you time by helping you experiment with options faster, but also by helping you avoid the mental wrestling match between your critical and creative mindsets.

The art of improvisation is one of the cornerstone skills developed in the Writerly Play Studio.

The Writerly Play Studio, like the other Writerly Play rooms, is designed to help creatives separate their thinking into distinct steps. By knowing the purpose of a thinking task, we can utilize activities toward stronger results.

In this set of Writerly Play activities, we’ll look at four ways creative thinkers of different styles might tap into the power of improvisation, while also playing to their strengths.

Choose the activity that best fits your creativity style. Not sure what your style is? Take the quick quiz and find out.

ACTIVITIES

The Who, What, & Where Experiment

FOR ARCHITECTS

Use this structured improv game to experiment with options for your next scene.

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Step Into Your Character's Shoes

FOR INVENTORS

Take on your character’s mindset and play through a scene in a variety of ways in this improv game for writers.

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Improvised Storytelling

FOR COLLABORATORS

Create a collaborative scene with a partner, using their questions to help you better understand your main character’s point of view.

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Improvise the Highlights

FOR SPECIAL AGENTS

Use this quick-thinking improv game to identify key moments in your scene and shortcut the experimentation process.

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Writerly Play Activity Collection: Finding Your Artist’s Heart

Writerly Play Activity Collection: Finding Your Artist’s Heart

How do you create meaningful work?

Putting our hearts on the page sounds simple, but it is one of the most difficult tasks artists face. In order to make powerful work, we must brave vulnerability and ask ourselves tough questions.

After a lifetime of improv, I’ve learned the best way into tricky emotional spaces often involves playing a game. Where I might craftily evade a pointed question, or truly believe I don’t know the answer, a playful approach can surprise the truth right out of me. Now, before you worry that I’m asking you to hop onto a stage under bright lights, let me assure you that game, in this case, is a loosely defined word. To awake your intuition, all a game requires is a clear goal and a bit of a challenge.

The art of finding our artist’s heart is one of the cornerstone skills developed in the Writerly Play Attic.

The Writerly Play Attic, like the other Writerly Play rooms, is designed to help creatives separate their thinking into distinct steps. By knowing the purpose of a thinking task, we can utilize activities toward stronger results.

Here is a collection of Writerly Play activities, designed to help you find your artist’s heart.

Choose the activity that best fits your creativity style. Not sure what your style is? Take the quick quiz and find out.

ACTIVITIES

Freewrite Your Heart

FOR INVENTORS

Move your hand across the page speedily to bypass your critic and discover your heart.

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Zoom In On the Heart

FOR ARCHITECTS

Answer three key questions to focus your attention on the core of this project, and its importance to you.

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Frame Your Heart in Three

FOR SPECIAL AGENTS

Choose three adjectives that focus your attention on the core of this project, and its importance to you.

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Share Your Heart with a Loved One

FOR COLLABORATORS

Choose a confidant and write a letter about your project. What is most important to you about creating this artwork?

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Writerly Play Activity Collection: How To Find Your Dream Mentor

Writerly Play Activity Collection: How To Find Your Dream Mentor

Do you have unexplored creative potential?

A mentor can help you identify and explore new territory.

When people ask me about the value of grad school, I always say that working with mentors saved me years of trial and error. In-person mentors are invaluable, and if you have the opportunity to work with one, I say go for it!

There is also much to gain from mentoring with master artists and thinkers who may not be accessable without a time machine or millions of dollars. Books, podcasts, videos, online courses … in this information age, we have a vast landscape to explore. So vast, that sometimes it’s overwhelming. That’s why I put together a collection of activities for thinkers of all varieties, all focused on choosing the best expert mentor for YOU.

Mentoring with master artists and thinkers is one of the core skills developed in the Writerly Play Library.

The Writerly Play Library, like the other Writerly Play rooms, is designed to help creatives separate their thinking into distinct steps. By knowing the purpose of a thinking task, we can make any activity more productive and achieve stronger results.

Here is a collection of Writerly Play activities designed to help you choose your dream mentor.

Choose the activity that best fits your creativity style. Not sure what your style is? Take the quick quiz and find out.

Activities

Profile Three Experts

FOR ARCHITECTS

Use insight from three experts to lead you to the perfect-fit mentor.

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Choose One Expert

FOR SPECIAL AGENTS

Focus on one expert in this strategic learning exercise.

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Create a Learner's Book Club

FOR COLLABORATORS

Explore what’s important to you in your idea by digging deep with a friend.

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Assemble a Think Tank of Mentors

FOR INVENTORS

Identify one-of-a-kind insights by connecting wisdom from an eclectic group of experts.

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